Another Dimension of Prescription Polarized Sunglass Comfort, Thinness, Ahhhh, Part Three

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Sunday, July 24, 2016 5:11 PM Size and Coverage (8) are inter-related. Look at this cyclist’s glasses, and then look again at the image of the young woman at the beginning of the course. Size and coverage is a key factor in comfort and they are different. Comfort therefore has more than one meaning and coverage describes how the frame and lenses deliver protection (glare and UV) while they make the long, wearing times outdoors, a pleasure.

Another Dimension Of Prescription Polarized Sunglass Comfort, Thinness, Ahhhh, Part Two

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Monday, July 18, 2016 12:10 PM Molecules in a polarizing filter are long in one direction (horizontal) and short in the perpendicular direction (vertical). Electrons can freely oscillate along the length of the molecule, absorbing or reflecting the light energy, while they are unable to oscillate very far along the short direction.

Another Dimension Of Prescription Polarized Sunglass Comfort, Thinness, Ahhhh, Part One

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Monday, July 11, 2016 10:40 AM

What makes for comfortable prescription sunglasses? Close your eyes and think of a variety of answers before you read any further. OK, got ‘em? Then ask your ECP colleagues what makes for a comfortable sunglass, I bet you hear a variety of answers. Are they the same ones you thought of?

Improving Free-Form Lenses With Variable Base Curves And Digital Individualization (Part Two)

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Monday, September 14, 2015 9:05 AM Do you agree with the statement, "Free-form, i.e., digitally-compensated lenses produce more satisfied patients"? I know most do agree, because when I ask that question to those in attendance at my classes, almost all of them selling digital lenses say they agree.

Improving Free-Form Lenses With Variable Base Curves And Digital Individualization (Part One)

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Sunday, September 6, 2015 1:05 PM

For every power, there is an ideal base curve. The industry, for various reasons, doesn't strictly adhere to this principle, but it's crucial to note that base curves are still very important. As it turns out, good optics are more closely related to base curve than typically thought.

Trivex Material, Still a New and Growing Lens Category

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Tuesday, July 28, 2015 7:35 PM Frame choice also drives material choice. Usually the patient will select their frames first and then the lenses. This can present a problem with some lens materials. Consider the combination of a plus lens and a grooved semi-rimless frame.

Trivex Material, Still a New and Growing Lens Category

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Wednesday, July 15, 2015 10:11 AM When compared to CR-39 monomer, lenses made with Trivex material are up to 15 to 20 percent thinner and always about a third lighter. An aspheric design will further reduce thickness and weight. While there are other higher index materials that can make lenses even thinner, lightness depends on final lens volume and its specific gravity.

Trivex Material, Still a New and Growing Lens Category

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Wednesday, July 1, 2015 10:10 AM

Trivex material’s development has been consistent with the way new technologies build sophistication into products. In the past, a lens material had to be more closely matched with the prescription and the end results wanted. This is no longer the case.

Double Asphericity, A Free-form Solution for Single Vision (Part Four)

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Tuesday, April 28, 2015 9:50 AM In the final Part Four of this series about utilizing newer lens designs and technologies to provide better vision for our single vision.

Double Asphericity, A Free-form Solution for Single Vision (Part Three)

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Wednesday, April 22, 2015 12:09 PM In Part One of this series we examined asphericity, dual asphericity, atoricity and Free-form as better choices for a clearer field of vision in single vision lenses. Each provides an improvement in the way that a patient sees.

Double Asphericity, A Free-form Solution for Single Vision (Part Two)

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Wednesday, April 15, 2015 10:05 AM In part one of this series we began to examine and discuss asphericity, dual asphericity, atoricity and Free-form as better choices for a clearer field of vision in single vision lenses.

Double Asphericity, A Free-form Solution for Single Vision

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Wednesday, April 8, 2015 1:00 PM How many reading this are promoting and selling Free-form progressives? Come on, put up your hands and keep them up.

Winners of the Great American Optician Video Contest Announced...

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Tuesday, September 23, 2014 10:38 AM

Seen these – you’ll smile because it describes a lot of what we do as opticians. From an Opticians Association of America email…

The Opticians Association of America (OAA) with the help of American Idol's Randy Jackson showcased the top three entries of the Great American Optician Video Contest today at Vision Expo West in Las Vegas, Nevada.

The Great American Optician Video Contest was designed to be a YouTube video contest where anyone located in the United States could submit a 30 to 90 second video conveying to a consumer what opticians are and what they do. Over 60 videos were submitted in the 45 days the contest was open for entries and those videos have been published on the OAA YouTube Channel.

Converting Prism Into an Order

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Tuesday, August 26, 2014 11:00 AM The Opticians Handbook received this question about a prism Rx for a patient experiencing vertigo:
"I recently got a prescription where the doctor asked for 1.5 degrees of prism base down at axis 255 right and 1.5 degree base down in the left at axis 255. What should I order? The doctor told me to order 1.1 base down with 0.50 Base Out right and 1.1 Base Down with 0.50 Base In."

Color for the Color Blind, Part One

By Mark Mattison-Shupnick, ABOM
Friday, June 20, 2014 2:30 PM I am always amazed at the fact that things we see in color are actually a sensation "felt." They are a sensory impression that is a physiological reaction to the wavelengths of light received by the color receptors in our retina.
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