The Real Details of Vertex, Tilt and Wrap, Part Three of Three

By Barry Santini, ABOM
Monday, November 9, 2015 10:05 AM With many variables to sort through in investigating a vision complaint, anything that could help to reduce the pool of possible suspects should be welcomed with open arms.

The Real Details of Vertex, Tilt and Wrap, Part Two of Three

By Barry Santini, ABOM
Monday, November 2, 2015 10:05 AM

Ask just about any eye care professional when knowing the fitting vertex distance of a pair of glasses is important, and they'll no doubt respond: "For powers over 6 diopters, you'll have to compensate the power for the difference between the exam vertex distance and the wearing vertex distance."​

The Real Details of Vertex, Tilt and Wrap, Part One of Three

By Barry Santini, ABOM
Monday, October 26, 2015 10:00 AM For most of the last century, eyeglasses were fabricated using a binocular measurement for pupillary distance, and simply dividing it in half to center the lenses for each eye. This method delivered apparently great patient satisfaction, as visual complaints were not clearly traceable to the lack of using a "proper" monocular PD....even for segmented multifocals.

High Rxs, Adds and Vertex Distance

By Staff
Tuesday, November 29, 2011 10:11 PM As increased precision is integrated into lens design, the delivery of the exact prescription is affected by the way that the lenses are positioned in front of the eyes.

Measuring Vertex: Distometer

By Staff
Monday, November 28, 2011 12:09 AM An original device for measuring vertex distance is called a Distometer. While unavailable for awhile, it's been remanufactured and sold through Western Ophthalmics.

Measuring Vertex Distance (mm Ruler)

By Staff
Tuesday, November 8, 2011 1:54 AM When wearing glasses, the distance from the front of the cornea to the back surface of a lens is called the Vertex Distance. Why is this measurement important?

Measuring Vertex Distance (Pupilometer)

By Staff
Wednesday, November 2, 2011 3:27 AM This method sometimes works if the pupilometer can get close enough to the eye so the image is not too blurred. To help, pull back the forehead bar.
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